Home Breaking News ‘Hometown Christmas’ offers abundance of holiday traditions

‘Hometown Christmas’ offers abundance of holiday traditions

4487
0
Members of the audience at Hometown Christmas sing "Silent Night" Sunday afternoon at the 1912 E.A. Williams Capel/Museum in Nashville. The program was sponsored by the Howard County Historical Society and was held in the recently restored museum at Hempstead and 2nd Streets in Nashville. The building was once the Presbyterian Church.

The Howard County Historical Society sponsored “Hometown Christmas” Sunday afternoon at the 1912 E.A. Williams Chapel/Museum in Nashville.

The program attracted a standing-room only crowd to the recently restored museum, which is housed in the former Presbyterian Church. The facility was decorated with fresh greenery as it might have been in 1912.

HCHS president Freddie Horne welcomed the crowd and also closed the program.

The Agape Handbell Choir from First United Methodist Church of Nashville presented “We Three Kings.”

Fifth graders Kyleigh Kuykendall and Emmie Gregory read the holiday classic “’Twas The Night Before Christmas by Clement C. Moore.

Rex Moorer read the Christmas story from Luke 2:1-20.

Jimmy Dale presented a Christmas acrostic, connecting different parts of the holiday season to the letters found in the word “Christmas.”

Eighth grader Kara Connell sang “Do You Hear What I Hear?”

David E. Young led congregational Christmas carols, including “Away in a Manger” and “Silent Night.” Young and Horne accompanied the audience on guitars.

Moorer gave the closing prayer.

Horne said the Christmas event provided the public an opportunity to see the work which has been done at the historic structure.

“After two years of renovation, the museum opened in August but many folks in the county haven’t had the chance to visit yet,” Horne said. “This gave everyone the opportunity to come see the museum decorated for Christmas and join with friends and neighbors in celebrating the joy of the holidays.”

The museum is located on the corner of Hempstead and 2nd Street in Nashville. The building’s architecture is a combination of two styles, High Victorian Gothic and Stick Style. It is the only structure in southwest Arkansas built in this style. 

The Museum is open Tuesday through Friday from 12-4. For more information contact Horne at 870-451-4288.

Members of the Agape Handbell Choir from First United Methodist Church present "We Three Kings" Sunday afternoon at the Hometown Christmas program at the Howard County museum in Nashville.
Members of the Agape Handbell Choir from First United Methodist Church present “We Three Kings” Sunday afternoon at the Hometown Christmas program at the Howard County museum in Nashville.
Jimmy Dale shares his holiday memories through a Christmas acrostic.
Jimmy Dale shares his holiday memories through a Christmas acrostic.
Members of the Agape Handbell Choir from First United Methodist Church present "We Three Kings" Sunday afternoon at the Hometown Christmas program at the Howard County museum in Nashville.
Members of the Agape Handbell Choir from First United Methodist Church present “We Three Kings” Sunday afternoon at the Hometown Christmas program at the Howard County museum in Nashville.
Freddie Horne plays the guitar during "Silent Night" Sunday at the Howard County Museum.
Freddie Horne plays the guitar during “Silent Night” Sunday at the Howard County Museum.
Rex Moorer reads the Christmas story from Luke 2.
Rex Moorer reads the Christmas story from Luke 2.
Kyleigh Kuykendall and Emmie Gregory present "Twas the Night Before Christmas."
Kyleigh Kuykendall and Emmie Gregory present “Twas the Night Before Christmas.”
Freddie Horner greets the crowd at the Howard County Museum Sunday afternoon for the Hometown Christmas program.
Freddie Horner greets the crowd at the Howard County Museum Sunday afternoon for the Hometown Christmas program.
David E. Young plays the guitar as he leads the crowd in singing Christmas carols.
David E. Young plays the guitar as he leads the crowd in singing Christmas carols.
Previous articleScrappers earn spots in school, state records
Next articleMount Ida coach among coach of the year finalists